Posts Tagged 'New York Botanical Garden'



Monday Meadows

meadow1Open these up.meadow2For megapixels of wonder.meadow3And speak not to me of lawns.

Cocktail Hour

Eremnophila aureonotataIs this too much John Cheever-John Updike, drunken wasps getting it on? Above are Thread-waisted Wasps (Eremnophila aureonotata) mating on that pollinator-magnet mountain mint (Pycnanthemum). Like many wasps, the adults eat nectar, but feed their larvae flesh. (OK, now we’ve entered Stephen King territory) These provision their young with caterpillars. Scolia dubiaBlue-winged, a.k.a. Digger Wasp (Scolia dubia) with their distinctive yellow dots on red-orange abdomen. These are all over the city; I walked by a swarm in the middle of a front yard in Park Slope recently. The females dig burrows in search of beetle larvae to feed their young; Green June Bugs and invasive Japanese Beetles are favored.

Snapper

Chelydra serpentinaSnapping Turtle (Chelydra serpentina), the smaller of two seen this weekend.

Note the spotless shell. Compare with another snap seen two years ago in the Discovery Center pond. Much more growth on the shell of that younger specimen. The huge beastie I’ve seen in Prospect Park’s watercourse a few times over the years has also evinced a spotless shell, which I attribute to chorine in the water (yes, it’s tap water). Here’s a little one in the Prospect Pools. Here’s a tiny one I found crossing the road a few years ago in Massachusetts.
Chelydra serpentinaShell length here 6-7″ long. Love the dinosaur thorns on the tail.

Traces of the Ice Age

striationsDon’t you just love these? These grooves are found along the path in the forest of the NYBG, and time and generations of feet have worn them down slightly. They’re glacial striations, gouged out by the rubble on the bottom the ice as it scraped across the hard surface rock.

These can be found in Central Park, too. But not here in the home borough, which is all glacial deposit–made up, come to think of it, with some of that Bronx rock.

Mammal Eyes

Sciurus carolinensisA young Grey Squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) in Green-Wood. You have to watch out for these: once, one started climbing up my leg, looking for a parent.Tamias striatusWinter’s coming! (As hard as it is to imagine.) So there’s no time for paternity suits at the NYBG. Eastern Chipmunk (Tamias striatus).

Tyrannus tyrannus

Tyrannus tyrannusThe Eastern Kingbird. What a binomial, eh?Tyrannus tyrannusThis one took a large bumblebee to a branch and battered it for a bit before gobbling it down.

Busy as…

IMG_8961

Great Spangled Fritillary

Speyeria cybeleA name that should always be said in a W.C. Fields’ voice.Speyeria cybeleSpeyeria cybele.

Beebalm

MonardaAnd balm for your Monday.Monarda

The Dragons Are Hunting

IMG_8947The shed exuvia of an Odonata. Dragon- and damselflies spend their larval stage underwater. These voraciously predatory nymphs climb up on reeds and other vertical structures, anchor themselves, and begin to break out and unfurl their wings, harden off, and then take to the air, leaving these ghostly husks behind.Perithemis teneraA male Eastern Amberwing (Perithemis tenera), our smallest dragonfly. Some damselfly species are actually longer. Erythemis simplicicollisA male Eastern Pondhawk (Erythemis simplicicollis), I think; the tell-tale wing markings are obscure here and I’m rusty…


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