Posts Tagged 'flowers'

Beebalm

MonardaAnd balm for your Monday.Monarda

Pokemon Go This

IMG_8955If I understand it correctly, the children (of all ages, horrifyingly enough) playing this game are “capturing” virtual cartoons in “real life.” I can’t say I see the appeal. There is entirely too much life to explore in this life, on this world, in this neighborhood.

You can’t see the detail in the picture here, but it’s summer and that means multiple species of dragon- and damselfly, half a dozen butterfly species, bees of all sorts, one being eaten by a Eastern Kingbird, and much more, not to mention the plants, plants, plants!flowers

Popping

Asclepias tuberosaButterfly Weed, Asclepias tuberosa.

Solstice

IMG_8698The sun will rise to its highest point in the sky today here in the northern hemisphere, meaning you will cast your shortest shadow of the year.

Look at those miniature suns at the edge of the path… Opuntia humifusaCloser: Opuntia humifusa, Prickly Pear Cactus, now blooming. This is the only native cactus in our part of the country. The plants favor the sandy soils of the coastal plain. Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge is where I await their blooms each year.

Bumble Rose

Bombus

Naval Cemetery Landscape

ncl1A prairie grows in Brooklyn, atop the decommissioned naval hospital cemetery at the Brooklyn Naval Yard. ncl2The Naval Cemetery Landscape is part of the Brooklyn Greenway Initiative. It is small, compact, and very grass-green.ncl3The day we visited last week was hot as global-warming-damned August, but the flowers will still mostly not yet in bloom.ncl4Some of the grasses were.ncl5From the Greenway site: “This experience evokes the histories of settlement and cultivation, life and death, while slowing the heart rate* and connecting visitors with the stories of the site. The wildflower meadow, with more than fifty species of native plants,** offers much needed fodder for the pollinators critical to the ecological health of the region. Initially established in a strict geometric arrangement, the plantings will eventually drift across the site, creating new patterns and establishing a self-sustaining, ‘open-ended’ ecology intended to draw people, birds, moths and bees in a rich celebration of life.”

*The only other people there that blazingly hot morning were two joggers and a workman on break from digging up the sidewalk. He seemed to get it.

**Note that the pictures under the Design and Nature tab stress the pretty flowers, not the unsexy grasses.

Fleabane

Erigeron philadelphicusErigeron philadelphicus, if I’m not mistaken, which has more common names than you can shake a stem at, including Common, Philadelphia, and Daisy Fleabane, although the latter is generally E. annuus.


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