Posts Tagged 'plants'

Still Skipping

img_1287What a late, endless fall. This picture of a skipper was from last Friday, and there was at least one other of these quirky butterflies still working these amazingly productive ground-hugging buddleia.

In case you haven’t noticed, I’m going full Thoreau in these posts. The inspiration for this blog was both a naturalist and a citizen. How could I be anything but?

Pitcher Plant

SarraceniaOne of the Sarracenia pitcher plants at NYBG; they’ve at least 7 American species in the Native Garden, though only one, S. purpurea, is native to New York.

Something’s blocking the tube here, but this moth still can’t seem to get out. No, this isn’t a metaphor for the times.

But, speaking of natives: my people came to the U.S. at least 200 years ago on my mother’s side and in 1870 on my father’s. I myself was born overseas, in Japan, where my parents were stationed with the U.S. State Department. I grew up in Poland, Canada, Italy, and Germany, as well as in MD and VA around DC.

Cosmopolitanism has always been my thing. There are lots of different kinds of Americans, and I like it that way. I live, after all, in the multicultural-polygot metropolis of Brooklyn, New York.

Yet this scoundrel of a con man Trump has used the filthy flag of nativism to gain power, giving unprecedented moral support to the worst aspects of our history, the Klan and neo-Nazis, causing a spike in verbal and physical violence against people black and brown, not least in schools. Eternal shame on those dupes who voted for this garbage, even if all they thought and hoped they were voting for was “change”; eternal support for all they threaten. I’m a middle-aged white man, but I utterly repudiate the bullshit stereotypically assigned to my ilk and will do all in my power to undo it.

Monday Meadows

meadow1Open these up.meadow2For megapixels of wonder.meadow3And speak not to me of lawns.

Woodland Aster

asterThere isn’t much of a concentration of trees in Green-Wood, as opposed to grand old specimen trees, but the tiny patch of woodland overlooking the Sylvan Water is host to these little asters, a burst of autumnal blooming. The reddish-orange parts have already been pollinated, the yellow not yet. Both bumblebees and flies were observed visiting these, which we think are Eurybia divaricata.

After Barely A Summer Dies the Bee

SolidagoThis goldenrod was chock-a-stem with bumblebees, carpenter bees, and honeybees, moving slowly if at all on a cool day. You could pet them if you liked. XylocopaThis is the last hurrah for the bumbles and carpenter bees, except for already mated queens, who will soon find a place tucked away in leaf litter for the winter. Female honeybees will overwinter in the hive, keeping their queen warm. It’s curtains for all the males.xylocopaI’ve never noticed the white face mark of the male Eastern Carpenter Bee (Xylocopa virginica).img_0410The great circle of life in action: a mantis munches away at a still-flailing bumblebee.

Autumn Meadows

Fat grasshoppers and noisy crickets. Bumblebees built for cooler weather. Darting moths stirred up by our presence. Palm Warblers absent the rufus polls of springtime, but their tails as derrick-like as ever. A falcon shoots by, too quick for us. We curse the god-damned helicopters, a constant curse over the island.img_0339And a few days later on the flank of the Harbor Hill Moraine. There was just a scurrying bird in here, probably a Common Yellow-throat, since that’s their style.img_0342autumnAnd one more patch, in the Native Flora Garden, which is stellar right now, above and below.img_0390

Aster Apotheosis

Symphyotrichum This is the time to see these Symphyotrichum asters. Above is a low-growing, smaller flowered version called “October Sky.”SymphyotrichumHere’s one of the bigger ones, both taller and larger-flowered. And there are still pollinators — bumblebees, honeybees, and some flies — working them over for the last of the nectar and pollen. The bumblebees are slow and groggy.

These were in the Native Flora Garden, but if you look you can see them all over.


Share

Bookmark and Share

Join 444 other followers

Twitter

Nature Blog Network

Archives