Posts Tagged 'Green-Wood'

Red-Tailed Hawk Stalking

Buteo jamaicensisA young Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) patrolling the 5th Avenue entrance of Green-Wood. I would hazard to guess that it is wondering where that Eastern Grey Squirrel went.Buteo jamaicensis

Trio of Dragonflies

Libellula pulchella12-spotted Skimmer (Libellula pulchella) male.
Plathemis lydiaCommon Whitetail (Plathemis lydia) male.
Erythemis simplicicollisEastern Pondhawk (Erythemis simplicicollis) male.

What’s up with all the males? They’re patrolling territory, in this case the ponds of Green-Wood, while females generally only show up to these sites when they want to mate. Otherwise the females are over the fields and meadows, at the edge of the woods, “across the river and through the trees”….

More Beetlemania

Sehirus cinctusThis tiny beetle is Sehirus cinctus, the White-margined Burrowing Beetle. 4-6.5mm long. There were several on the very hairy leaves of what looks like Stachys something or other.

Adult females of this species care for their young, which is fairly unusual in the insect world. Plenty of insects provision their young, but most aren’t around to feed them directly. Wasp mothers, for instance, who feed their young with paralyzed spiders die before they see their next generation. But let’s not get sentimental. Different strategies for different folks.

These beetles can sometimes swarm on your ornamentals, but they are harmless feeders on the seeds of mint family plants, so leave them alone. And for the planet’s sake, don’t spread the poisons of pesticides/insecticides: that shit harms beneficial insects and ends up in the water and, surprise, surprise, you, too. Sehirus cinctus

Pollination Nation

IMG_9354IMG_9166IMG_9362IMG_9164

Mammal Eyes

Sciurus carolinensisA young Grey Squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) in Green-Wood. You have to watch out for these: once, one started climbing up my leg, looking for a parent.Tamias striatusWinter’s coming! (As hard as it is to imagine.) So there’s no time for paternity suits at the NYBG. Eastern Chipmunk (Tamias striatus).

Orange Bluet

Enallagma signatumMost of the bluet damselflies are, you guessed it, blue, but this one bucks the trend. Sort of: this is a mature male, but when he was younger, he had blue markings instead of these orange ones. Enallagma signatumEnallagma signatum.

Butterfly Showcase

Danaus plexippusStarting to see a few Monarchs (Danaus plexippus) out and about. Danaus plexippus

Papilio polyxenesAnd the Black Swallowtails (Papilio polyxenes) are also active now. Male above, female below, I think.Papilio polyxenes

Papilio glaucusEastern Tiger Swallowtail(Papilio glaucus) female. A very conspicuous butterfly, both for her size (4-4.5″ wingspan) and her bold tiger-like patterning. Males lack the deep blue.

Vanessa virginiensisBut wait! Delaying this post has meant I keep running across more species! This American Lady (Vanessa virginiensis) was spotted the other day. Close enough to touch.Vanessa virginiensis

Here, then, is every species of butterfly I’ve seen within the bounds of NYC. I only have three skippers listed, but there are certainly several more “grass skipper” species that I just can not differentiate.

Sachem (Atalopedes campestris)
Red-banded Hairstreak (Calycopis cecrops)
Spring Azure (Celastrina ladon) ? this complex is complicated!
Common Wood-Nymph (Cercyonis pegala)
Orange Sulphur (Colias eurytheme) these two Colias are pretty hard to differentiate, but I think I have
Clouded Sulphur (Colias philodice)
Eastern Tailed Blue (Cupido comyntas)
Monarch (Danaus plexippus)
Silver-spotted Skipper (Epargyreus clarus)
Duskywing (could have been Horace’s, Erynnis horatius or Juvenal’s, E. juvenalis)
Common Buckeye (Junonia coenia)
Red-spotted Purple (Limenitis arthemis)
Mourning Cloak (Nymphalis antiopa)
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus)
Black Swallowtail (Papilio polyxenes)
Spicebush Swallowtail (Papilio troilus)
Common Sootywing (Pholisora catullus)
Pearl Crescent (Phyciodes tharos)
Cabbage White (Pieris rapae) — our most common butterfly, introduced from Europe.
Tawny-edged Skipper (Polites themistocles) ?
Eastern Comma (Polygonia comma)
Question Mark (Polygonia interrogationis)
Great Spangled Fritillary (Speyeria cybele)
Grey Hairstreak (Strymon melinus)
Northern Cloudywing (Thorybes pylades)
Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta)
Painted Lady (Vanessa cardui)
American Lady (Vanessa virginiensis)

All my butterfly posts. Which ones are you seeing?


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