Posts Tagged 'Green-Wood'

Spiders

These small wolf spiders have been in every layer of leaves I’ve looked at closely in Green-Wood for a couple of weeks now. Not grass, leaves, which give them so much cover.
So many in the Dell Water I was afraid I’d step on them. They are runners and jumpers.
A different species, and found in different habitat. This time a leaf pile. There was a small beetle as well, but it was too quick for me.

On Thursday, they’ll be some more here about leaves and the critters they hide. (Thursday! Two whole days away, and people say I’m a pessimist!)

Weekend Birds

Two pairs of Wood Ducks on the Lullwater.
Male Belted Kingfisher above them. Have there been Kingfishers in both Green-Wood and Prospect all winter?
When the light hits a Common (ha!) Grackle just right, look out!
White-breasted Nuthatch.
Pied-bill Grebe.
Some Red-winged Blackbirds are back, and, more importantly, they are making noise.
Mallard and Ring-necked ducks on Sylvan in Green-Wood. Everybody else pictured here was in Prospect.
A trio of Golden-crowned Kinglets were withering and thithering.
Love the touch of red in their stripe of a crown. Impossible (?) to see with the naked eye.

Great Blue Dino-heron

Water Bugs and Birds

Under a thin layer of ice, two true bugs in the Crescent Water. The first is a water boatman, the second a backswimmer.
Not all of the pond was iced over. Aerators keep donut holes of water ice-free, and the edge along one side of the pond was also open. This Eastern Phoebe was making short forays over the water and sometimes dipping into it. Not, I think, to drink, but to plunge for prey! Just a guess, considering there are obviously insects to be had in the cold water.
This Phoebe (presumably the same one) seems to have been around all winter. So has this male Belted Kingfisher. He is also leery of people, but a lot noisier about it. Making dive after dive for little fish, usually not hitting, but obviously striking enough to be stick around. (Yesterday I saw him gulp down a goldfish.) The Kingfisher hovers like a Kestrel over the water before plunging, something I’ve never seen before this winter.

Breeding Birds

The third edition of the New York State Breeding Bird Atlas project is underway. So far I’ve submitted observations to ebird of American Kestrels mating and Common Ravens carrying nesting material.

One of them, anyway.
I almost always hear these big corvids before I see them. One of their most common calls is a “ha-rupp” grunt-like noise that makes me thinks of pigs (admittedly, I haven’t been around too many pigs). Then I’m all ears, looking all around.

A historical note: it was January 1, 2015 that I first saw a pair of Common Ravens canoodling here in Brooklyn. They’ve have nest here ever since. Well, so we think. They’ve been observed gathering nest material, gathering food, and flying with their young. Nobody, to my knowledge, has ever found the nest. Which is damn surprising.

Class of ’19.
Class of ’16.

Prunus serotina

There are still, after all these years, parts of Green-Wood I’ve never been. I came across this massive black cherry only recently.
It was after a big wind and bits of the scaly bark and branches were scattered about.
The mature bark is very different from the younger stuff from way up there.
Turning over the loose pieces on the ground, I found a Nabis genus damsel bug.
And a springtail! (And something even smaller I can’t tell what).

February Blooms

Crocus.
Prunus.Veronica.


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