Posts Tagged 'Green-Wood'

Mammal Monday

Eastern Chipmunks (Tamias striatus) are few and far between in Green-Wood. I see them there rarely, but the other day a wren-brown spot in the distance, which I thought might, in fact, be a wren, turned out to be this one.

There are rather more Chimpmunks in Prospect Park. The closest these two green islands in Brooklyn come is just over half a mile. Windsor Terrace, the neighborhood in between, is not a wildlife corridor. A friend who lives in Windsor Terrace calls it Alpine Brooklyn, because it is between the two highest spots of elevation in the borough.

Squash Vine Borer Moth

Wow! Nectaring on common milkweed, this moth is just a little bigger than a Western Honeybee.
Have you ever seen one? I never had until Friday.
You might know them from your zucchinis. The caterpillars of Melitta curcurbitae love to eat summer and winter squashes, but if this is your reward, perhaps a little homage is in order?

Note the clear hind wings. There are several other clearwing borers in the family Sesiidae. They’re diurnal bee/wasp mimics.

Also found flying during the day are the two clearwing sphinx moths in the family Sphingidae: Hummingbird Clearwing and the Snowberry Clearwing.

Warblers

Sometimes they land right in front of you. Magnolia Warbler.
Other times, most times, not so much. Bay-breasted Warbler.
Rather more typical view… Wilson’s Warbler, named after pioneering ornithologist Alexander Wilson.
And sometimes, termites reproductives, the winged ones, emerge, and the songbirds fly right overhead hawking them out of the air. (As I was trying to count Cape May Warblers, a Rudy-throated Hummingbird got close enough to me for me to hear its wings.)
American Redstart.
Two different Blackpoll Warblers. “Poll” old word for head. One of the farthest flying migratory warbler species.

All spotted yesterday amid the rain/reign of Swainson’s Thrushes in Green-Wood.

No Regrets For Egrets

This documentary on Jamaica Bay from a few years ago is available for free until the end of the month.

Spiders

These small wolf spiders have been in every layer of leaves I’ve looked at closely in Green-Wood for a couple of weeks now. Not grass, leaves, which give them so much cover.
So many in the Dell Water I was afraid I’d step on them. They are runners and jumpers.
A different species, and found in different habitat. This time a leaf pile. There was a small beetle as well, but it was too quick for me.

On Thursday, they’ll be some more here about leaves and the critters they hide. (Thursday! Two whole days away, and people say I’m a pessimist!)

Weekend Birds

Two pairs of Wood Ducks on the Lullwater.
Male Belted Kingfisher above them. Have there been Kingfishers in both Green-Wood and Prospect all winter?
When the light hits a Common (ha!) Grackle just right, look out!
White-breasted Nuthatch.
Pied-bill Grebe.
Some Red-winged Blackbirds are back, and, more importantly, they are making noise.
Mallard and Ring-necked ducks on Sylvan in Green-Wood. Everybody else pictured here was in Prospect.
A trio of Golden-crowned Kinglets were withering and thithering.
Love the touch of red in their stripe of a crown. Impossible (?) to see with the naked eye.

Great Blue Dino-heron

Water Bugs and Birds

Under a thin layer of ice, two true bugs in the Crescent Water. The first is a water boatman, the second a backswimmer.
Not all of the pond was iced over. Aerators keep donut holes of water ice-free, and the edge along one side of the pond was also open. This Eastern Phoebe was making short forays over the water and sometimes dipping into it. Not, I think, to drink, but to plunge for prey! Just a guess, considering there are obviously insects to be had in the cold water.
This Phoebe (presumably the same one) seems to have been around all winter. So has this male Belted Kingfisher. He is also leery of people, but a lot noisier about it. Making dive after dive for little fish, usually not hitting, but obviously striking enough to be stick around. (Yesterday I saw him gulp down a goldfish.) The Kingfisher hovers like a Kestrel over the water before plunging, something I’ve never seen before this winter.

Breeding Birds

The third edition of the New York State Breeding Bird Atlas project is underway. So far I’ve submitted observations to ebird of American Kestrels mating and Common Ravens carrying nesting material.

One of them, anyway.
I almost always hear these big corvids before I see them. One of their most common calls is a “ha-rupp” grunt-like noise that makes me thinks of pigs (admittedly, I haven’t been around too many pigs). Then I’m all ears, looking all around.

A historical note: it was January 1, 2015 that I first saw a pair of Common Ravens canoodling here in Brooklyn. They’ve have nest here ever since. Well, so we think. They’ve been observed gathering nest material, gathering food, and flying with their young. Nobody, to my knowledge, has ever found the nest. Which is damn surprising.

Class of ’19.
Class of ’16.

Prunus serotina

There are still, after all these years, parts of Green-Wood I’ve never been. I came across this massive black cherry only recently.
It was after a big wind and bits of the scaly bark and branches were scattered about.
The mature bark is very different from the younger stuff from way up there.
Turning over the loose pieces on the ground, I found a Nabis genus damsel bug.
And a springtail! (And something even smaller I can’t tell what).


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