Posts Tagged 'Brooklyn'

Death Comes for the Monarch

There are some ants on the remains of this Monarch larva. Waste not, want not. I’ve seen a couple caterpillars in this position, suspended in preparation for starting the pupa, who didn’t make it. The Spined Soldier Bugs (nymphs and adults) are one enemy, but I wonder what other creatures or diseases strike these plump cats down. Remember, milkweed essentially fills a caterpillar with toxins, yet obviously the Spined Soldier, among others, can handle that.The rain too has made a contribution to the dissolution of some corpses. But I must be feeling optimistic:
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Do you know the story of the Callery Pear? It’s another invasive nightmare.

Monarchs: The Next Generation

Chrysalis down! It was still attached, so I positioned this leaf in the thicket so that the pupa would hang down.Half of the newly emerged adults seen Friday.Larval stage still at it.This early instar was as long as a dime across.Milkweeds make butterflies. These have been completely stripped of leaves. This tiny patch had two dozen caterpillars on it two weeks ago.

Return of the Return of Monarchy

I hope you didn’t think you were going to get away from these things, did you? I’ve had an unparalleled experience watching these critters for two-three weeks now. Missed all this in school, by the way, but must say, the wild is more appealing. A variation on the pattern; I’ve seen similar once before.
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Already on shaky ground truth-wise, Kavanaugh firmly denies, following his rapey boss Trump’s strategy of deny, deny, deny… while, paradoxically, Republicans insist that what a white prep school boy does at 17 doesn’t count anymore. Pollitt discusses. Remember, Trump called for the execution of teenage rapists (they were innocent, by the way; of course they were also black) and it’s standard Republican strategy to brand sex offenders for life. Meanwhile, Kavanaugh dissented in a decision to let a 17-year-old in immigrant detention have the abortion she wanted: he wanted to force her to have a child.

Is it too much to say that forcing girls and women is a through-line in the ideology of this repellent radical misogynist?

Smeared Dagger!

The Smartweed Caterpillar is also known after its adult moth form, the Smeared Dagger (Acronicta oblinita). According to Wagner’s Caterpillars of Eastern North America, these are quite variable.Here’s another, missing the red highlights. Excellent opportunity to see the morphology here: the three pairs of thoracic legs (with simple claws) on the left, the four pairs of anterior prolegs, and the pair of anal prolegs (all with hooks and hair-like setae). Tuffs of setae are found in many of the 75 North American species in this genus (!).

Wagner’s book is filled with amazing images of caterpillars, most of which I’ve never seen. For instance, this is the first time I’ve run into this spectacular species. (Inexhaustible nature!) There were three of them visible on Friday. The adult moth is quite plain in comparison.

Lobster Claws

The emptied husk of a dog day cicada (Neotibicen). This is the final form of the underground nymph stage of these annual cicadas, which spend four to five years underground sucking on plant roots, counting the days. They’re “annual” because there’s a brood or cohort every year. This is split open and hollow inside now, because the adult form has emerged to make its way up into the tree for a summer of, ideally, love.

There were nine of these on the bole of this fat beech in Green-Wood a week ago. That’s a lot. Other beeches had one or a few on them. Do they like beeches in particular, or are these exuviae just easier to spot on the silvery-gray bark?

Revenge of the Monarch

This is the whole point, right? A new butterfly, hiding under a leaf next to her chrysalis husk. She’ll dry off, harden up, get ready for the world. And what a world! Is this the generation that is Mexico-bound? I’m guessing so since it’s already mid-September. How does she know? Remarkably, these long-distance, south-bound migrants can live up to nine months, compared to the 2-5 weeks of summer generations. How do other caterpillars know not to eat the leaf this pupa is hanging from, or do they? Two more. My eyes are getting better at this. Both suspended from the milkweed leaf’s midrib. Did they do it at the same time or did one follow the other, as if it was a good place, or is it just random? Monarch sex determination is set at fertilization. There’s a way a tell if the pupa is male or female, evidently, but you have to look closely, and I’m not handling any of these since I follow the Prime Directive. Here’s a Spined Soldier Bug adult sucking the life out of one of the caterpillars. I’ve been seeing the nymph stage assassins at work, but this is the first adult I’ve seen.Saw about three dozen live caterpillars in action, September 6th, overcast hot and grossly humid, and a trio of dead or dying.

Planet of the Monarchs

Yes, please! A veritable orgy of caterpillars. I counted 47 in Green-Wood on the morning of September 5th. I have never seen so many, anywhere.I went early to avoid the heat, but phew, it was still pretty beastly. Obviously, I can’t survey the milkweed further in this tight little meadow. There are probably more caterpillars to be found within.Of note, another nearby patch of milkweed isn’t showing nearly the same level of activity as this one. I wonder why? It gets more shade: could the female butterflies, who lay one egg per plant, skip it more often for this patch, which is in the sun all day long?Found one new pupa/chrysalis, for total of three in process.Many of the caterpillars were late-stage, the big fat ones in the last of five instars before pupation. This one has begun to pupate, anchoring and turning up.24 hours later. Note the two silk anchors; I haven’t seen these before. This chrysalis is high up above the meadow’s average height, so is this extra protection from the wind? 30 hours after that, those two silk strands were gone.But not everybody gets that far.Here’s another goner. Note the killer, a nymph Spined Soldier Bug. True bugs suck, literally. And the other living (munching) caterpillar nearby; these larval stage Monarchs have six simple eyes, but don’t see very well.Another shout-out to Green-Wood for planting milkweed. The end result looks like hell, but as is so often the case, looks are deceiving. This is paradise.

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The CCR’s legal briefing on civil disobedience.


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