Posts Tagged 'mammals'

Gallish

Went on a walk last weekend in Central Park in honor of Alexander Von Humboldt and the late mycologist Gary Lincoff. We met at the Explorer’s Gate, next to the Humboldt bust. The baby vomit stench of ginkgo fruits, rotting and crushed on the sidewalk, deterred us not.

The venerable American elm behind Alex reaches over the wall to the right and sends branches well below the street level down below to the park level. It’s cosseted by cables linking the outstretching limbs. It’s a good metaphor for the park itself: it takes a lot of support to keep this going, to handle the millions who pour into its bounds every year.

Seen amidst the conversations:
A very pale Mallard variation, presumably a feral domesticated bird.
New York City, baby! Big as a Sherman Tank and just a few feet away from the second most crowded bridge in the park.
Hackberry Star Gall, caused by a psyllid, Pachypsylla celtidisasterisca, a kind of true bug.

Mammal Monday

Yes, it was hot this weekend. A little house-crazy, I ventured into Green-Wood early Saturday morning. My shirt was plastered to me in no time, and this in the shade before 9 a.m. But everybody’s got to eat. In my case, I need the sustenance of life, like for instance spotting this munching squirrel. And being, in turn, spotted.

Raptor Wednesday

I’d hoped to be able to report some exciting falcon-reveal news about the local American Kestrels. The parents have been here and there, but as of this, written late yesterday afternoon, we’ve got nada to say about fledglings.Meanwhile, can I offer you this dicey situation as a substitute for your Wednesday raptor needs? A perched Red-tailed Hawk, being chirped at by an Amerian Robin or two, and this Grey Squirrel sort of moaning in a tree knot.The hawk spent much more time looking elsewhere, that old ploy.This is the way we left the stand-off.

PSA

The serviceberries are ripe.

Mammal Monday

Telephoto edition.There were at least two young squirrels in here.
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Interesting programs at the Linnaean Society and Brooklyn Bird Club tomorrow. Unfortunately at the same time. The LSNY is a double-header: Sara Lewis on fireflies, followed by J. Drew Lanham on the art of writing natural history. The BBC has Tessa Boase on the fight in Britain against feather fashion.

Earth Day

This beat-up skull comes courtesy of a Great Horned Owl. The owl chomped this down and then spit it back up after the bird’s battery acid stomach had a go at it. I think these might be the remains of a Grey Squirrel skull. Found with plenty of grey hair smushed into the cavities. Cleaned up a bit with toothpick and hydrogen peroxide, but it was already virtually bleached by the owl. Check out these incisors and molars.

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Forty-nine years since the first Earth Day. Here are forty years of measurable transformations in migrating birds: a new study finds warmer temperatures are decreasing body size and increasing wing length.

Mammal Monday

It’s just remarkable how the sound of teeth gnawing on hickory shells travels in the winter woods.


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