Posts Tagged 'flowers'



Details

Same patch, same day.Crab spider lurking…

Another generation of something arthropod…

Meadows

The protected grasslands at Floyd Bennett Field are looking fine in autumn.You can fill your screen with these by clicking on them.

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Much less of a pretty picture: on the rise of illiberal democracy there and here.

Autumnal Flowers And Their Familiars

There’s only so much in bloom now.But there are still hungry insects.And insects that eat insects.The goldenrod smorgasbord.

This Used To Be Turf

A meadow, a-roaring with crickets. Just listening was enough to be get through all the terrible noise of the day, the terrifying state of the nation, the unending human assault on the planet’s life. Get thee to a meadow these early autumnal days! Bonus here is that this hillside in Green-Wood Cemetery was reclaimed from turfy grass, a veritable dead zone of lawn.

I want to send a sincerely heartfelt “thank you!” to contributors to Backyard and Beyond’s fundraising effort. I’m astonished and humbled that this was so successful, surpassing our goal. Take a bow gentle, generous readers:

Anonymous
Theresa
Russ
Anonymous
Karl
Marion
Diane
Anonymous
Donna
Jean
Anonymous
Ellen
Greg
Sidney
Ruth
Anonymous
Karen
Peggy
BB
Linda
Carol
Jamie
(In reverse order of contribution.)
Two rows of eggs.

Second Magnolia

There’s a tendency in some of these exotic magnolias to bloom again in late summer.

Should be a few metaphors in this, wot?

Busy as…

“Moral anger against oppression needed to be matched by an understanding of how economic systems create and sustain that oppression” Two interesting historical takes at Little Sis (vs. Big Brother) on the importance of connecting the dots. On the military-industrial system, which of course never went away. And at SNCC, on the front line of battling white supremacy.

Sphex ichneumoneus

What a gorgeous wasp. Feeding on Monarda punctata, whose flowers are rather attractive, too.
Great Golden Sand-digger. As the common name suggests, they nest in solitary holes in the ground. Adults feed on nectar. The female provisions her young in these sandy nest caves with paralyzed Orthoptera: crickets, katydids, grasshoppers.The back of the thorax is hairy, too, something I’ve never noticed before.

This wasp is found from Canada down to South America. Here’s an abstract on nest site selection.

More reflections on Europe’s (and the world’s) loss of insect life.
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“…today any liberalism which is not also radicalism is irrelevant and doomed.” John Dewey said that in the 1930s. His view of democracy, which he argued was only as strong as the people supporting it, is as timely as ever.


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