Posts Tagged 'bees'

After Barely A Summer Dies the Bee

SolidagoThis goldenrod was chock-a-stem with bumblebees, carpenter bees, and honeybees, moving slowly if at all on a cool day. You could pet them if you liked. XylocopaThis is the last hurrah for the bumbles and carpenter bees, except for already mated queens, who will soon find a place tucked away in leaf litter for the winter. Female honeybees will overwinter in the hive, keeping their queen warm. It’s curtains for all the males.xylocopaI’ve never noticed the white face mark of the male Eastern Carpenter Bee (Xylocopa virginica).img_0410The great circle of life in action: a mantis munches away at a still-flailing bumblebee.

Aster Apotheosis

Symphyotrichum This is the time to see these Symphyotrichum asters. Above is a low-growing, smaller flowered version called “October Sky.”SymphyotrichumHere’s one of the bigger ones, both taller and larger-flowered. And there are still pollinators — bumblebees, honeybees, and some flies — working them over for the last of the nectar and pollen. The bumblebees are slow and groggy.

These were in the Native Flora Garden, but if you look you can see them all over.

Beewings

bee1One the Megachile leaf-cutter bees. bee2A nice look at the bee’s fore and hind wings. Hymenoptera, the “membrane-winged” insects (bees, wasps, and ants) and have four wings.

Dragonflies and butterflies would surely agree with the Hymenoptera that four wings are the best, but flies probably wouldn’t. Flies (and mosquitoes) are in the order Diptera (“two-winged”): they have vestigial wing-stubs called halteres which seem to act as stabilizers in flight. Beetles, whose forewings have turned into elytra, or wing-coverings, might disagree too…but then, they’re not known as great fliers, so maybe they wouldn’t.

Megachile on Asclepias

MegachileLeaf-cutter bee on Butterfly Weed.

You can’t tell this when they’re in the air, or, frankly, very easily when they’re still, but bees have four wings (flies have two). In this photo, however, you can just see the smaller hindwing underneath the forewing on the right side here.

Brooklyn Long-horns

Melissodes bimaculatusThis black bee was a real brawler, tackling each flower like a linebacker, rolling up and over the flower parts until it was upside-down.

Note the long opera-glove-like sleeves of pollen on the hind legs. These legs have more hair than the other two sets, and these pollen packs are rather larger than you see on most bees who do this (leaf cutter bees, for another example, store pollen on the underside of their abdomen); this and the antenna helped me identify this one. Two-spotted Long-horned Bee, Melissodes bimaculatus. It is supposed to be common in the east, but I think this is the first time I’ve seen/identified one. This is one of the solitary bee species, not social like the non-native honeybees or partially social like some bumblebees.

Over two hundred species of bees have been found in NYC, but honeybees and several species of bumblebees are the most commonly recognized. Yet when you look closer, there’s so much more going on. This one was all over the flowers outside my apartment building.

Pollination Nation

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Air Bee and Bee

IMG_8777A local bee motel. There was a wasp checking in, to. This is a rather elaborate one, offering several possibilities for wood- and cavity- nesters. (But don’t forget the ground-nesters!)

The Xerces Society has some helpful hints on building your own to encourage pollinators.


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