Posts Tagged 'invertebrates'

Spiders!

I don’t think they’re scary, but my goodness, this one sure was big.
Common House?
One of the long-jawed orbweavers?
Couldn’t see this with the naked eye, but in the camera, wow!
Basilica Orbweaver.
Characteristically makes vertical hangings of its egg cases.
There were a bunch of these Basilicas in these bushes. What a revelation!
Sometimes the big webs have somebody in the center of them. Spotted orbweaver of some kind.
Sometimes they don’t. But the spider is going to be somewhere nearby.
Long-bodied Cellar?

In the Queen’s Chamber

Let this be a lesson to me. I turned over a rotten old log that was about two feet long and a quarter of that in diameter. It came apart in three pieces. This stirred up this Bald-Faced Hornet, all covered in saw dust. Must be a queen in her over-wintering chamber.

A thousand pardons, Your Majesty! I put the wood back together after she resettled in her hollow.

Elsewhere that same Saturday, this nearly eye-level nest was still active.

Acorn Drillers

As is my wont, I pocketed a red oak acorn recently. Almost a week later I noticed this: a little wormy something was cutting it’s way out! Note the frass pile.

Perhaps a Curculio nut and acorn weevil. More here.

Not pictured, but this also happened with a shingle oak acorn, which has a much smaller nut than the red. The exit hole hole was correspondingly smaller, so perhaps the work of another species.

Bald-Faced Washing

Bald-faced Hornet licking the stonework. Getting salts and minerals?
Also, licking forelegs to groom antennae. Like a cat!
The grooming wasp was spotted Saturday in the sun. This nest was seen Sunday, with at least one wasp hanging around still.

Butterflies Are Free

Recognize this? This was a surprise at the recent Whitman exhibit at the Morgan Library and Museum, where the image for the exhibit shows a famous photograph of the older WW holding a butterfly.

Yup, one and the same. (Bigger on the M’s site…)

And in that spirit:
A full house, Monarchs high.

Butterfly Reprise

What a year for butterflies! All these were seen in the last two weeks. I’ve now seen 28 species in Kings County, according to iNaturalist. Plus one skipper, oh those bedeviling skippers, only identified to genus level.

I meant to post this yesterday, but I screwed up the scheduling. It was 94F on Wednesday and the butterflies were busy. Yesterday dawned at 55F and the temp didn’t stray much from there all the daylight hours. Definitely not butterfly weather.

Under the Lilac Bush, Again

Remember the Wasp Lilac? Cicada-killer Wasps and a few other wasp species, but mostly Cicada-killers, were sucking the sap from this one bushy specimen in Green-Wood. Well, more than one lilac, actually, since the one nearby was also being suckled at.
A month later, I happened to look again, and now it’s the turn of the European Hornets.
Vespa crabro is another big, burly wasp. I usually see one or two patrolling places with lots of pollinators. They are rather generalist when it comes to prey.
And they also clearly like the sugary stuff.
Cleaning. The fastidiousness of big killers like these is something to see.
Those mouth parts! These are serious jaws. And that tongue, at least I think it’s the tongue, looks very hairy.


Share

Bookmark and Share

Join 590 other followers

Twitter

Nature Blog Network

Archives