Posts Tagged 'mollusca'

Eggs & Memories

Slug eggs! I think. Quite small.
I didn’t notice them at first, as I was photographing this beetle under a log.
Some beetles are shy. Only later did I see the spheres in the photograph.

I’ve been delving into the archives to see what else has turned up in early Aprils past:

2018: Brooklyn Kestrels!
2017: Some turtles in oldest Virginia.
2016: Accipiter bath.
2015: Lores of an egret.
2012: Leaves of three.

This is a must-read on thinking during a pandemic.

Slug in the Greens

In the Japanese turnip greens, purchased in Brooklyn but sourced in Lancaster PA. Perhaps one of the threeband slugs of the genus Amibigolimax.

Sautéed the greens after a good washing, with some lettuce, garlic, and hot pepper flakes. The turnips themselves, which are quite small, were peeled and chopped up for a bean salad.

Sinister Snails

Little freshwater mollusks in the Physa genus, according to the iNaturalist community. The aperture is on the left side, hence sinistral. In the Sylvan Water. How did they get here? Did they arrive via muddy duck feet, a noted transportation system for plants and animals?Less than a centimeter long, with some smaller. To the nearly six-foot tall observer, they look like tiny rocks.
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Nathaniel Rich’s NYTimes Magazine article on climate change last summer has been expanded into a book called Losing Earth: A Recent History.

This review provides a good synopsis. It also notes something Rich dug up that I’d never heard of before, a JASON (scientific advisors) report to the Department of Energy. The Long Term Impact of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide on Climate was published in 1979. Nineteen-fucking-seventy-nine. I tracked it down. The brainiacs suggest that if current conditions etc. continued the amount of atmospheric carbon dioxide would double by 2035 and the resulting warmer planet would have ominous results the world over. The report was largely ignored. 1979!

Since then, the carbon giants, whose own scientists told them the same thing, have so successfully poisoned so many susceptible minds, that the likes of the Oregon situation is unfolding.

Marine Park

Hot and fecund summer comes at you and doesn’t let up. My camera bursts with photos after a walk, an exploration, an adventure. Time barrels along, even though the humidity seems to want to slow it down. These are all from a trip three weeks ago to Marine Park on Brooklyn’s southern edge.A nice little example of the Spartina alterniflora and Geukensia demissa relationship.This dense wet muck soil would be anoxic without the fiddler crabs burrowing into it. They’re the third leg (claw?) of the salt marsh’s grass/mussel/crab trifecta.But be careful, little crabs, the Great Egret stalks at low tide.Even murkier, a Yellow-crowned Heron does the same.It’s also time for shorebirds to start thinking/feeling about heading south. This yellowlegs was grooming and resting. Greater, methinks, not Lesser.Overhead, fledgling Barn Swallows were being fed in mid-air. A half dozen take a break; there’s also a Tree Swallow at the top.The caterpillar here is probably destined for the next generation of Red-winged Blackbirds.

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The post-truth reactionary regime is already going strong: half the states are lying about abortion. 

You can see the slugs and the trees

treesA brief trip to some of the wet rainforests of the northwest was a revelation.

There will be more to come, but shall we begin with an atypical sublimity?AriolimaxBanana slug, Ariolimax genus,perhaps A. columbianus, Pacific Banana Slug? There are two other species, and differentiating them sounds a bit gross. About 4″ long.AriolimaxThese are named for the ripe-banana spotting. Here’s another Ariolimax, munching mushrooms, of which there were plenty.

Great Wall Addendum

Limax maximusLeopard Slugs (Limax maximus). An introduced species, thinking about making more of themselves. And what a process that is!

Spring Cleaning Snails

snailsThree different specimens of our old friend Cepaea nemoralis.snail2snail3snail4The snail’s “foot,” which gave rise to the name for this whole class of Molluscs, Gastropoda, which means simply stomach-foot (and is anatomically incorrect; the stomach is in the portion of the animal that is inside the shell).snail5Just a size comparison with some other snails found during this clean up. The mm ruler looks bent because the macro lens distorts at the edges, either that or the omphalos of the shells draws gravity in like a black hole.snail6Unknown species on the left;Discus rotundatus on the right.


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