Posts Tagged 'ladybugs'

Ladybugs!

Hippodamia convergensConvergent Ladybugs (Hippodamia convergens) uh, um, converging. This year’s aphid boom needs more lady beetles!Propylea quatuordecimpunctataFourteen-Spotted Ladybug (Propylea quatuordecimpunctata).Harmonia axyridisThis looks like a variation of the Multicolored Asian Ladybug larva (Harmonia axyridis). These last two were spotted in Flatbush Gardener’s patch during the C-9 release.

C-9s Return to Brooklyn

Coccinella novemnotataThe New York State insect is the Nine-spotted Ladybug, also known as C-9 (Coccinella novemnotata). This was once one of the most common species of ladybug found on agricultural fields across North America. No more. I’ve still never seen an adult. In fact, nobody could find any in New York for more than two decades until just a few years ago. They were probably out-competed by all the introduced species of ladybugs from Eurasia or our West Coast; a reduction of habitat and, I would hazard to guess, the killing pesticides and other chemicals we spew all over everything.Coccinella novemnotataBut Cornell’s Lost Ladybug Project, which has been using citizen scientist data to track ladybug populations, now sells C-9 larvae. Last week we joined Flatbush Gardener for a release of the larvae in his amazing Brooklyn garden. Coccinella novemnotataThere were Multicolored Asian Ladybugs (Harmonia axyridis) in FG’s garden, so it will be interesting to see if he gets any C-9 adults who reproduce. The ones pictured above and below look like they just need to scarf up a few more aphids before they’re ready to pupate.Coccinella novemnotataAll my ladybug posts can be found here.

Bugs At Last!

You’ve been waiting patiently all winter long for some serious insect life to liven things up. This was the week!
Coleomegilla maculataTwo color variations of the Spotted Lady Beetle (Coleomegilla maculata).Coleomegilla maculataThese are in the Coccinellidae family of ladybugs, but clearly not the usual rounded shape of the classic VW. Sure are spotty, though: another common name for them is Twelve-Spotted Lady Beetle. I wasn’t familiar with these.Ischnura positaThe first damselfly I’ve seen this season is our old friend the Fragile Forktail (Ischnura posita). There was another smaller species flitting about that eluded my lens.IMG_6776These were tiny and, presumably, larval. But larval what is the question.Polygonia commaSeen at a distance yet still identifiable with that Comma (Polygonia comma) mark!

Bonus: All of the above were spotted in Great Swamp NWR. Here in the city, massive Carpenter Bees are buzzing around wood (houses, benches, telephone poles, etc.) now looking for a place to nest. On the desolation called 4th Avenue, there’s a tiny patch of ground behind the 36th subway entrance, between fences (Green-Wood is beyond), that seems to be attracting some ground nesters as well.

Hedgehog Galls, Ladybug

gall1According to my own personal memory device, this is the third year I’ve noted these hedgehog galls on this White Oak (Quercus alba) in Green-Wood. This year there is a bumper crop of them.lady3A Multicolored Asian Ladybug (Harmonia axyridis) on the galls.

Lessons

Harmonia axyridis
1. It’s hard to focus an iPhone in the wind with one hand.
2. Looks like I need a manicure. Although I’ve have never had one, so I probably won’t ever get one.
3. Never believe anybody when they say the city is a sterile wasteland with nothing but pigeons and a surplus of rats. Just down the block from a Kestrel nest in the valley of the industrial-wasteland bordering the Superfund site of the Gowanus, I find a Multicolored Asian Lady beetle (Harmonia axyridis) on something growing out of the crack between sidewalk and building.

Two-Spotted Sightings

My first ladybug of the year was spotted on the weekend. It was, no surprise, a Multicolored Asian, Harmonia axyridis, which you should expect to see just about everywhere. I also saw very small lady beetle I’m not yet sure of the identification of. But on Monday, I saw half a dozen Two-spotted, Adalia bipunctata, which made me very happy. (See the essay I wrote about these for Humans & Nature.) Adalia bipunctataThis is the classic form.

Adalia bipunctataThis is the black form. Yes, that’s a human neck it’s on.

Still Hanging On

In early November, I found four adult Two-spotted Ladybeetles (Adalia bipunctata). Adalia bipunctataAnd without looking very hard. I just stood under the tree and looked up.Adalia bipunctata


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