Posts Tagged 'damselflies'



D&D Tuesday

D&D stands for Damselflies & Dragonflies. At least here it does. This is a Great Blue Skimmer male (Libellula vibrans).This one is actually fairly red, so feel free to curse this backlighting. A Calico Pennant (Celithemis elisa). A first for me.
Female Needham’s Skimmer (Libellula needhami). Another first-time sighting. And the male Needham’s, I believe.Another view of this perching-by-the-pond-(the female was off a way in the meadow)-at- the-limit-of-my-optics dragonfly.

These were all spotted on Staten Island, the Odonata hub of the five boroughs.

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FYI: Geoff Wisner will be reading from his juicy collection Thoreau’s Animals tomorrow in Inwood.

D&D Roundup

Fragile Forktail (Ischnura posita) female. Eastern Pondhawk (Erythemis simplicicollis) male.Familiar Bluet (Enallagma civile) male.Eastern Amberwing (Perithemis tenera) male.Sometimes, we must work with the image. This looks like a Stream Bluet (Enallagma exsulans), a new species for me. Only segment 9 is completely blue; the blue rings on the other abdominal segments are conspicuous. Plus habitat is a good tell: this the “most common species at running waters” says Ed Lam. Of, course there isn’t much running water in Brooklyn. I saw this one on the Cross River.

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Let’s review. A President elected by a minority of voters. Who has utter contempt for truth, justice, and the American way. Who has a clear affinity for authoritarianism. Who is a monstrously corrupt kleptocrat who privileges the family businesses over the nation’s. Who has a cabinet of ideological horrors dedicated to stripping away protections of our food, water, workplaces, & etc. Who is backed by a shameless and ruthless party of corporate plutocracy (and racism, to keep the serfs on board) dedicated to the annulment of democracy (voter suppression and gerrymandering for a start).

How long will the Republic last this assault? Yet, as David Cole notes in this interview, we still have a huge advantage in defending our rights and liberties against this clear and present danger: a very robust civil society and an independent judiciary.  Above all, citizenship!

The old American mule, as sick as she is, hasn’t been ground into burgers yet!

Ebony Jewelwing

Flying moth-like on broad dark wings, their abdomens metallic green or blue, depending on the light, Calopteryx maculata are probably the most recognizable of our damselflies.Males are pictured above. These and the females below were spotted around the Cross River in the Ward Pound Ridge Reserve in Westchester County. I’ve not seen them in NYC*.The females have distinctive white pseugostigmas.

*They have been documented on Staten Island. In the 2009 state odonate survey, Staten Island (Richmond Co.) had 75 species of dragonflies and damselflies; Brooklyn (Kings Co.) had 23. I’ve tallied 24 species in Brooklyn.

Odonata Days

Well, I’ve finally seen a damselfly this year. Yesterday, I saw exactly two at the Sylvan Water in Green-Wood. I didn’t have my camera with me, but I did find something to share with you. This is an exuvia, the shed husk of the underwater larval stage of damsel- and dragonflies. This one is a damselfly, I think. UPDATED: I’m thinking wrong. Above is a dragonfly. Damselflies, like the one below, have three appendages coming off the end of the abdomen; these are external gills. And this one looks to be a dragonfly. SEE ABOVE. However, this one didn’t make it. (The larvae emerge from the water, grab a hold of something, and then the adult breaks through the husk, to harden its exoskeleton over the next hours.) The only dragonflies about the Sylvan Water were Eastern Amberwings. The Valley Water, site of many previous Odonata adventures, had no sign of either damsels or dragons. There are no lily pads there now, and judging from last year, I suspect it will not be very productive as we get further into the heat of summer. The lily pads were the great sport and joy of several species.

Rambur’s Forktail

Ischnura ramburiiI’ve spotted another Brooklyn damselfly species, bringing my NYC list up to nine species. This is a male Rambur’s Forktail (Ischnura ramburii). Approximately 1.25″ long. He was flitting about the edge of Green-Wood’s Sylvan Water among a fair number of Familiar Bluets.Enallagma civileThis is a pair of Familiars (Enallagma civile) in the mating grip: the male will hold on as the female lays her eggs, and even when she’s not, which precludes another male from assuming the position.

According to odonate master Ed Lam, there’s a population of Rambur’s at Jamaica Bay and they will sometimes stray inland.

Orange Bluet

Enallagma signatumMost of the bluet damselflies are, you guessed it, blue, but this one bucks the trend. Sort of: this is a mature male, but when he was younger, he had blue markings instead of these orange ones. Enallagma signatumEnallagma signatum.

Seaside Dragonlet

Erythrodiplax bereniceThis is a female Seaside Dragonlet (Erythrodiplax berenice), spotted recently on Plumb Beach. This is the only American species of dragonfly that breeds in salt water, in this case probably the saltwater marsh tucked behind the beach. To be honest, I couldn’t see any of the handsome orange and black patterning on the abdomen and thorax  in the bright sunlight. It was only after looking at the pictures later that I could identify this one.Erythrodiplax bereniceSo this makes for 16 species of dragonflies I’ve identified within New York City. This has all been by eye (and lens-enchanced eye); hardcore odonate-philes will net specimens. (Would definitely get a few more if I snagged ’em of the air and examined closely, but I’m guessing that would not be a pleasant experience for them.) All of these have been in Brooklyn except the Unicorn Clubtail. I have not explored Staten Island, the ode mecca of the city, nearly enough.

Common Green Darner (Anax junius)
Unicorn Clubtail (Arigomphus villosipes) *Bronx
Swamp Darner (Epiaeschna héros)
Common/Eastern Pondhawk (Erythemis simpliciollis)
Seaside Dragonlet (Erythrodiplax berenice)
Twelve-spotted Skimmer (Libellula pulchella)
Painted Skimmer (Libellula semifasciata)
Great Blue Skimmer (Libellula vibrans)
Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis)
Wandering Glider (Pantala flavescens)
Spot-winged Glider (Pantala hymenaea)
Eastern Amberwing (Perithemis genera)
Common Whitetail (Plathemis lydia)
Autumn Meadowhawk (Sympetrum vicinum)
Carolina Saddlebags (Tramea carolina)
Black Saddlebags (Tramea lacerata)

Here are all my dragonfly posts.

And here are damselfly species I’ve IDed in NYC, a harder proposition since they’re generally so much smaller. (And when I say I’ve IDed them, that means I’ve often had help from the Northeast Odonata group on Facebook.)

Blue-fronted Dancer (Argia apicalis)
Azure Bluet (Enallagma aspersum)
Familiar Bluet (Enallagama civile)
Orange Bluet (Enallagma signatum)
Citrine Forktail (Ishnura hastata)
Lilypad Forktail (Ischnura kellicotti)
Fragile Forktail (Ischnura posita)
Eastern Forktail (Ischnura verticalis)

Check out this NYS odonate survey completed in 2010. 22 species of d & d were noted in Kings County (Brooklyn), an estimated 75% of what they thought there should be. The Seaside Dragonlet was NOT recorded on that survey, although it was in the historic records they consulted so they counted it.


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