American Woodcock Fallout

It must have rained timberdoodles Friday night, because Saturday morning I came across 25 of them in Green-Wood. This shattered my record. Another three were probably repeats, flushed from here to there.

A cold front fall of American Woodcock. (Besides fall of woodcock, plump, cord, and rush are recored as collective nouns for them; I hereby nominate “fluster” because they make a noisy fuse when flushed.) I got a hint this might be the case because on Friday, people were reporting a lot of them smashed up in the city. These are low migratory fliers, and the city’s buildings and glass winnows an awful toll.

At one point, I saw some motion out of the corner of my eye. Bins up: a Hermit Thrush next to a tree. Behind the thrush in my binocular view was a Woodcock!
Scanning under this one tree, I saw four more. Under a nearby bush, one more. Half-a-dozen nestled together in close proximity. And not a one flushed!

More tomorrow? Hellya!

2 Responses to “American Woodcock Fallout”


  1. 1 Rebecca McMackin November 11, 2019 at 9:50 am

    They look like cuttle fish nestled in.

    Rebecca McMackin
    Director of Horticulture
    Brooklyn Bridge Park

    • 2 mthew November 11, 2019 at 11:55 am

      Having just been perusing the new Octopus, Squid % Cuttlefish book from Univ of Chicago Press, I see what you mean and am jealous I didn’t see this comparison, too.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s




Share

Bookmark and Share

Join 614 other followers

Twitter

  • Up with the robin And the light of the big moon Social distancing 38 minutes ago
Nature Blog Network

Archives


%d bloggers like this: