Even More British Birds

 Emberiza schoeniclusA very vocal male Reed Bunting (Emberiza schoeniclus) popped out of the dunes. Sternula albifronsAt Long Nanny along the Northumberland shore, we ran into a fence across the beach. As we were trying to figure out the best way to proceed, a volunteer National Trust ranger emerged from the dunes, where she’d had her eye on us. She was guarding the beach nesters, Little Terns (Sternula albifrons) and Ringed Plover (Charadrius hiaticula). The Little Tern is another species in decline, with some 1900 breeding pairs in the UK. Unleashed dogs, egg collectors (illegal, but these characters are often sociopaths if not psychopaths), habitat destruction, etc. are all a problem. She said we could pass by as close to the water as possible, then “paddle” across the low tide rush of the Nanny pouring into the sea. But first she invited us to see the nesting birds. At the time, there was one nesting Little Tern (Sternula albifrons) there. The pictured bird was actually another example of the species, resting not nesting nearby. On July 1, 18 chicks and 30 more eggs were reported. SylviaWhen I saw this new-to-me bird, I said to myself that I would name it a Whitethroat. Bingo! Sylvia communis. But then I turned the page and there was a Lesser Whitethroat (S. curruca). Uh-oh. I still think it’s the communis. Correct me if I’m wrong.Certhia familiarisTreecreeper (Certhia familiaris), another new bird for me. A couple of young, with tail feathers not yet fully developed, were also leapfrogging between trees with this adult.Vanellus vanellusNorthern Lapwing (Vanellus vanellus) at the island end of the Holy Island causeway. A species that has suffered significant declines and is now listed as Red by the RSPB, meaning it has the highest conservation priority. We saw two.Somateria mollissimaSeveral female Common Eider (Somateria mollissima) shepherding a whole flotilla of their (?) young.

2 Responses to “Even More British Birds”


  1. 1 erikleo July 18, 2015 at 4:46 am

    Long Nanny! That brings back memories; I was a vol ranger/warden there many years ago. Hope the little terns are doing ok?


  1. 1 The Narrowest Edge | Backyard and Beyond Trackback on February 19, 2016 at 7:06 am

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