Young Snap

Chelydra serpentinaFour, count ’em four, Red-eared Sliders (Trachemys scripta) were basking in the tiny, northernmost pond on Pier One at Brooklyn Bridge Park the other day. Fools keep releasing these invasive, potentially disease-carrying pet-trade animals. Some do it for religious (!) reasons! The effects of all this can be seen in the water course in Prospect Park. There were three dozen RES basking recently in the Pools. (I once counted 70 in the Lullwater.) Two Painted Turtles, a species native to the region, were seen among the most recent crowd, but the real discovery this day was this young Snapping Turtle (Chelydra serpentina).Chelydra serpentina I’ve seen snappers as little as a silver dollar and as big as a Fiat — no, make that a minibus — but not in-between, at least here in Brooklyn. Glad to see there are other generations in the mix. Chelydra serpentinaThe carapace (top shell) was about 6″ long. Snappers aren’t normally a basking species — but the winter was cold! — which is why it’s hard to say how many young ones there are in the park.

3 Responses to “Young Snap”


  1. 1 mthew May 30, 2017 at 7:12 am

    Reblogged this on Backyard and Beyond and commented:

    For Prospect Park’s 150th anniversary, I’m reposting discoveries from the archive in celebration. Here’s a young Snapper from 2015:


  1. 1 Snapper | Backyard and Beyond Trackback on August 24, 2016 at 7:02 am
  2. 2 Muckle Turkle | Backyard and Beyond Trackback on April 9, 2017 at 8:01 am

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