Strix varia

Strix variaA hot tip from someone who wishes to remain anonymous clued me into this Barred Owl (Strix varia) located… somewhere in NYC.Strix variaI had to agree to be blindfolded before being led to the site; it was either that or ride bundled into the trunk. This close-up shows what looks like a small delicate bill, but owls actually have large, gaping mouths — the better to swallow their prey whole. Strix variaThe bird was in full sunlight, soaking up that winter warmth. Owls in daylight are often tucked away so they won’t be harassed by their legion of enemies. In fact, I looked hard into the Yews besides this owl to see if there was another. I found something completely different, which I’ll blog about tomorrow.Strix variaThis is one of my best ever views of any owl species, up there with last year’s shameless display of Snowy Owls and the owl ranch down in Texas. Strix variaTurns out they have real bobble heads, turning round and up and down with great facility. Strix variaThe Barred Owl is found throughout the East and across the southern span of Canada, the northern Rockies, and the Pacific NW and up through BC. They are a woodland bird, favoring mature hardwoods in the north and bald cypress in the SE. Their call is famous, a veritable sentence, inevitably described as “Who, Who cooks for you?”

2 Responses to “Strix varia”


  1. 1 mthew February 7, 2016 at 8:29 am

    Reblogged this on Backyard and Beyond and commented:

    A few years ago, somebody (or somebodies) came up with the idea of Superb Owl for this day of thralldom to the sports-concussion industry. Here’s one of my most superb, a Barred Owl roosting in the Bronx. You can find all my owl adventures here https://matthewwills.com/tag/owls/

  2. 2 elwnyc February 7, 2016 at 7:09 pm

    I always heard that this owl says, “Who cooks for you? Who cooks for you allll?” One of my friends regularly calls them out of the woods on our trips.


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