Archive Page 2

Sheltering-in-Place

Tucked in.
Doorman.
Deep embedding. That’s a squirrel snout visible in this floor-through.
Two hours later, this Great Blue Heron was still there.

Midge

Non-biting midge bigger than your average fly,
characteristically holding his forelimbs out in front. The feathery antennae are reminiscent of some moths. Probably cold, letting me get the phone camera close up.

You’ve Heard of Moonrise

Well, this is Cardinal rise…
The Cardinals in Green-Wood are going full throttle. There’s is also a local one who likes to sit in a tree in the backyard across the street. He’s a small red speck to the eye, but his cheer-cheer-cheer voice travels. And boy, is that clarion welcome right now!

Spring arrived at 11:49pm last night (EDT), so today is the first real day of it on this side of the equinox. I like my spring days. Of course, migrating songbirds prefer the night….
***

Just a quick note: there are ten years of blog posts here, plenty of exploration for those sheltering-in-place or quarantined. Lots of wild animals and plants for children stuck at home in those venues, like NYC, that have shut down schools, too!

The “Subject” index on the right is a good place to start searching. The blogroll of honor connects to many another portal to wonders.

Blooming Now

Red maple.
Wych elm.
Apple.
Cherry.
Star magnolia.
Ginkgo.
Henbit deadnettle. (These are tiny, you’ll need to get down on your knees to see the detail.)

Raptor Wednesday

If you crossed Rear Window and The Birds
The local American Kestrels making more little falcons. Copulation lasts about ten seconds. Frequency seems to be key. They’ll do it multiple times a day, totaling hundreds of times over the pre-brooding period.

Sturnus vulgaris

It’s damned invasives for the beginning of the week here at B & B.
Starlings.

Passer

House Sparrows love these stop light support structures. Love them! There’s often a pair nesting in each end.
The male is keeping a very sharp eye on me.
A species hardly ever noticed. This is another male near the nest shown above. Here is another:
They’re awful sociable.


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