Posts Tagged 'plants'

Elevated Meadow

elevated1Leaning towers of Sunchokes (Helianthus tuberosus).Asclepias tuberosaAsclepias tuberosa going to seed. Both on the High Line.

Meadowview

monarch

Tadpoles

tadpolesOne of the unexpected sights during our walk along the Northumberland Coast Path was this (tidal?) pool full of what we thought were Common Toad (Bufo bufo) tadpoles. Surprising because this was brackish water at best, if not fully the brine of the nearby North Sea. Bufo bufoIt seems, though, that they can tolerate a certain amount of salt. And they are not the only amphibians to do so. I found this abstract of a journal article that provides a “review of the literature of amphibians in saline waters and present data on 144 species, in 28 families, on every continent except Antarctica. In doing so, we make the case that salt tolerance in amphibians may not be as rare as generally assumed.” IMG_3017Speaking of salt tolerance: near the tad-pools were some clumps of Glaux maritima, which seems to have more common names than you can shake a tadpole at, including, in the UK, Sea Milkwort. Found across the northern hemisphere, on coasts and high-elevation alkaline meadows.

VLB Adult

Pyrrhalta viburni In less than a decade, the invasive Viburnum Leaf Beetle (Pyrrhalta viburni) has spread throughout most of New York State. They devour the leaves of viburnum species, key understory plants of our woodlands; a couple years infestation can kill the plant. I’ve seen the damage they do in Prospect Park, skeletonizing every leaf on a bush. In Brooklyn Bridge Park they’re trying to control things by hand.

But this was the first time I’ve run across one of the adult beetles. Yesterday in Prospect Park.

A Great Wall

wallSunset Park is buttressed by a rough stone retaining wall that has become the home of numerous lifeforms. Above is the southwest-facing flank. wallNEHere’s the northeast wall, along 41st St. That’s where all the following were found:LichenThe presence of lichen, which doesn’t tolerate pollution, means the air here is relatively good. Indeed, elevated near the top of the Harbor Hill Moraine, the park catches the harbor breezes very nicely.Sagina subulataThere are numerous clumps of Scotch Moss (Sagina subulata), which isn’t a moss but rather a flowering plant.fernHaven’t yet figured out which fern this is. A spleenwort perhaps? Parthenocissus quinquefoliaVirginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia).Halysidota larrisiiThe caterpillar of the Sycamore Tussock Moth (Halysidota larrisii). Wikipedia says these can cause hives; this Auburn entomology page says nix to that, while listing other “stinging” caterpillars.’

“Stone wall, Sunset Park ……… $50,000” from the May 10, 1906, edition of The City Record. Would love to know where these stones came from.

Butterfly Dependence

A short walk on the High Line yesterday morning:Vanessa atalantaThere were several Red Admirals (Vanessa atalanta); this one was all over the Purple Coneflower (Echinacea).Papilio glaucusTiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus). Danaus plexippusNot as close to the camera: my first Monarch of the year. On Blazing Star (Liatris spicata).

Milkweeds

While I was away, the milkweeds of Brooklyn all came out. Some of them in Brooklyn Bridge Park are nearly as tall as I am. But here is my favorite, Butterfly Weed, which usually stays pretty close to the ground: Asclepias tuberosaAsclepias tuberosa.


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