Posts Tagged 'Green-Wood'

Seen on recent saunters

FagusBeech nuts and the pods they come in on. bumblestump1At another beech tree, this time a stump, some funky fungus.I like the way one of these “organ pipe” mud-dauber-wasp nests follows the arch here. Colaptes auratus
leavesIt will be some months before we see the trees this leafy again.

Bold eye-ring

IMG_8176I’m feeling too lazy to identify this bird. I’m just enjoying it. Happens like that sometimes.

Updated: voices via various other forms of communication are plugging for a Nashville warbler. I would agree.

Troglodytes

Troglodytes hiemalisIt’s rare to spot the tiny Winter Wren (Troglodytes hiemalis) out in the open, but this one was most obliging long enough to get a shot or two. They usually prefer damp, shady areas, underneath logs and the like. Note the long bill and what seem like largish toes, the better for poking and scratching in the leaf litter, duff, and other nooks and crannies. Like all our wrens, they pack a lot a voice per half ounce, but this one was silent as the tombs surrounding us in Green-Wood.

Sympetrum Meadowhawks

Sympertrum vicinumThe red meadowhawk dragonflies are difficult to identify in the field, since several members of the genus Sympetrum look rather similar.Sympetrum vicinumBut I figured these out because of the legs. These are Autumn Meadowhawks (Sympetrum vicinum), in some sources called Yellow-legged; other meadowhawks have black legs. They’re small: 1.3″ long. Sympetrum vicinumTheir colors, especially the bright males, rival fall’s leaves.Sympetrum vicinum“Typically the last species on the wing northern climes,” says the Stokes guide, although it was a balmy 80 when I ran into them in Green-Wood this weekend.

Black Swallowtail

Papilio polyxenes Papilio polyxenes

Future Odes

Perithemis teneraEastern Amberwings (Perithemis tenera) in the reproductive wheel: the male holds the female by the back of the head; the female curves her abdomen up and forwards his genitalia, located (counterintuitively?) at the base of his abdomen. Pachydiplax longipennisA female Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) dipping her abdomen down to lay fertilized eggs in a bit of water floating on a lily. Enallagma civileIn some species of Odonates, the male will continue to hold the female after mating and through the egg-laying process, precluding another male from mating with her, as with these Familiar Bluets (Enallagma civile). They can fly in tandem like this. Some species’ males will scoop out a previous male’s sperm from the female before adding his own with his specially equipped penis.Pachydiplax longipennisBlue Dasher females don’t seem to need chaperones. And look at all the eggs! Like pieces of short-grain rice, but much smaller. Of course, you know many will not make it to adulthood. These eggs were another post-photo discovery.

Spotted (or Not) and Streaky

Actitis maculariusSpotted Sandpipers (Actitis macularius) — no spots once they’ve moved out of their breeding plumage — are patrolling the edges of fresh water bodies now during migration. Parkesia noveboracensisAlso along the watery edges these days are Northern Waterthrushes (Parkesia noveboracensis).


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