Posts Tagged 'Green-Wood'

Transition

IMG_1877This larval critter was snapping and bucking in the water. IMG_1887Because it clearly had places to go. Or something to become.IMG_1892

Tad?

IMG_1893In the Sylvan Water at Green-Wood. Tadpole…?

Turtlenecks

Trachemys scriptaThe all too-common Red-eared Slider (Trachemys scripta). Note those neck line patterns. TurtleOn the same day, close by, was this specimen. This one differs by having the yellow line go up past its eye.TurtleAnd by having an oval shape on the neck. Missing, too, is the red stripe behind the eyes which give Red-eareds their name. The stripe can fade with age, but this one is not so large/old. Still, I can’t figure out what species this could be if not a RES.

The Birds Certainly Do It

Melanerpes carolinusRed-bellied Woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus) throwing out some wood chips from a nest cavity. Both birds were working on the excavation, and defending it from cavity-stealing Starlings. Polioptila caeruleaOne of a pair of tiny Blue-gray Gnatcatchers (Polioptila caerulea) crafting a nest of spider webs and lichen. Yes, that’s right, spider webs and lichen.Zenaida macrouraMeanwhile, having gotten the jump on practically everybody, early nesting Mourning Doves (Zenaida macroura) already have young ones clamoring for food.Zenaida macroura

And the bees evidently do it, too, although rather differently. A feral honeybee hive was just a few trees away from the Blue-grays.

Another Leucistic Robin

Turdus migratoriusThere was a leucistic American Robin (Turdus migratorius) seen in Prospect Park for at least five years, if I remember correctly. This one, spotted in Green-Wood last week, has much less pigmentation in the feathers. Turdus migratoriusThere’s enough of the bricky red in the breast to let you know that this is, in fact, a Robin.
Turdus migratoriusBut otherwise, this one sure sticks out in a crowd of Robins.

Raptor Wednesday

Buteo jamaicensisA Red-tailed Hawk in Green-Wood. I was on a ridge, so the bird was only a little above eye-level.

Ol’ Blue Eyes

Phalacrocorax auritusPhalacrocorax auritus, the Double-crested Cormorant, with reflections of cherry trees in torrid bloom in the water.


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  • This weather is a like a free trip to Maine. Also good practice for the North Sea. 8 hours ago
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