Posts Tagged 'flowers'

Pollen Bumble Rumble

bombusFlying between these absurdly large flowers of hybrid rose mallow (Hibiscus moscheutos), this bumblebee was practically glowing yellow from all the pollen.bombusBut note how the wings remain mostly clean. Bees are hairy, the hairs statically charged to help pollen stick to them. Of course, you wouldn’t want your wings to be laden with pollen or anything else when you fly.

More Sumac

Rhus typhinaStaghorn Sumac (Rhus typhina) in exuberant fuzziness.

Some Pollinators

p1p2p3p4It’s National Pollinator Week, but we should be thanking the bees — and other pollinators — every day for the work that they do. And fighting like the dickens the exterminationists of the agribusiness/pesticide complex.

Sumac

RhusThe flowers of sumac (genus Rhus) are astonishingly small.

Roses

roserosesrose2roses2

Plants and other lifeforms

Vaccinium angustifoliumA few more from Maine. Here’s Low-bush Blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) in flower. I’m mad for those little Maine blueberries, which I get frozen and eat all winter.Trientalis borealisStarflower (Trientalis borealis).Cornus canadensisBunchberry (Cornus canadensis), a wildflower relation of Dogwood.Arisaema triphyllumJack-in-the-Pulpit (Arisaema triphyllum) needs to be revealed. Hiding its light under a bushel. This is a plant I’ve never run across locally, and more is the pity.maine2A lichen? Fomitopsis pinicolaRed-belted or banded polyphore (Fomitopsis pinicola).witches broomA fine example of witch’s broom, whereby something (fungi, insects, mites, nematodes, viruses, etc. are all possibilities) causes the plant to grow wildly thusly. They are variations on the principal of the gall: another life form hijacking the plant’s own growth systems. In this case, the intruding element interferes with the hormone that limits bud growth, and the tree goes wild.

Blue Flag

Iris versicolorBlue Flag Iris (Iris versicolor) blooming now. These are also known as Wild Iris, Harlequin Blueflag, and Northern Blue Flag. Look for them in swamps, marshes, and wet shorelines from Virginia to Canada. Watch honeybees and native bees land on the large petal, which must look AMAZING in their ultraviolet-shifted vision, and scoot down into the nectary through the roofed-over passage. Sometimes they’ll exit on the side if they are small enough.


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